Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol
Clifton Suspension Bridge is one of the most beautiful engineering structures in the world. It is located in the suburb of Bristol, UK. The bridge spans the Avon Gorge and…

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The Rock of Gibraltar - Pillar of Hercules
The Rock of Gibraltar is a geology miracle located on the British territory of Gibraltar, on the Iberian Peninsula. This magnificent monolith is owned by the United Kingdom, located on…

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Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol
Clifton Suspension Bridge is one of the most beautiful engineering structures in the world. It is located in the suburb of Bristol, UK. The bridge spans the Avon Gorge and…

Continue reading →

Scotland’s Culture. Scotland Traditions. Scottish Cuisine

Historically, Scots have been underrepresented in British art and music, but they have nonetheless given the world a huge legacy in science, literature and philosophy. The Scots discovered logarithms, the second law of thermodynamics, and the laws of electrodynamics; they revolutionized steam power and invented asphalt, water resistance, telephone, television, and radar. Scots are pioneers in the development of anatomy, antiseptics and penicillin. One of the representatives of this nation, Adam Smith, developed the idea of the “invisible” hand of capitalism. The Scots attribute the above-mentioned achievements to the fact that the country has long placed a significant emphasis on education.

Scotland has an amazing artistic heritage. This reputation can be confirmed by such outstanding personalities as “savage” Robert burns, as well as participants in Hollywood celebrations, for example, Evan McGregor and Robert Kalail. Literary festivals come in wild delight from writers such as Irvine Welsh, tells the story of the Grange and drugs. Probably the most striking example of Scottish culture is the North Scottish bagpipe, which reached its peak of popularity during the reign of Queen Victoria – she liked to Wake up to the game of bagpipes outside her window. Scottish – another example of Scottish culture – refers to the Roman period, but after the 17th century it was associated only with certain clans. Although kilts and other clothing of the North of Scotland were banned after the Jacobite uprising, in the next century they again became part of the culture. The basis of traditional culture was “ceilidh” (a party with music and dance) or a visit, a public meeting held after a working day, where the local bard told folk stories and legends and sang songs. Such evenings are held to this day, although now there are less stories, more dancing and full of alcohol.

It is probably fair to say that religion has had a greater influence on the history of Scotland than on the history of any other part of Britain. Christianity came to Scotland in the 4th century, and in a place with the reformation of the Scottish Church came out of papal power. Later, among the Scottish Protestants formed a split, Presbyterians advocated a simplified Church hierarchy. Two-thirds of Scots belong to the Scottish Church, however, in the highlands and Islands more common strict United free Presbyterian Church. Glasgow is home to the Catholic majority of the country, and after the reformation some Islands were secretly converted to Catholicism. Although the conflict between religions cannot be compared in scale with the conflicts in Northern Ireland, it is present in Glasgow, especially when the Protestant football team plays against Catholics.

Up to 12 or 13 century in the whole of Scotland spoke the Gaelic language, though in the southern part of Scotland for centuries spoke lallans (English dialect, which arose under French and Scandinavian influences). Currently, about 66,000 people speak Gaelic, particularly in the Hebrides and North-West Scotland. Efforts are being made to stop his disappearance, and there are many Gaelic words that have become part of everyday speech and make Scottish English absolutely incomprehensible to foreigners.

Scottish chefs use only fresh products: meat, seafood and vegetables. They are famous for some of the world’s best dishes from wild animals (such as smoked salmon, venison and black grouse). Other legendary Scottish dishes include porridge, shortbread, Haggis (a delicious mixture of chopped lungs, heart and liver mixed with oatmeal and cooked in a sheep’s stomach, which has an amazing taste; you can also try its vegetarian version), Scottish meat broth and modern gourmet drinks, as well as deep-fried Mars bar.

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