Marble Arch London
Received an honorable place in front of Buckingham Palace, but later transferred to Hyde Park, the marble arch of London was modeled after the example of one of the most…

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5 things that do not need to go to London
London is the capital of the Great Britain - this phrase is familiar to everyone who has studied English. It is not entirely correct, since Great Britain is the name…

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National Gallery. The most important London museum
The National Gallery is one of the most important London museums. Here is an impressive collection of paintings, covering the period from 1260 to 1900 with the works of almost…

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Piccadilly Circus Square in London

Circus Square is a lively square in the heart of London. It is known for its nineteenth-century fountain and neon signs that turned the square into a miniature version of Times Square. Piccadilly Circus is located at the crossroads of five major roads: Regent Street, Shaftesbury Avenue, Piccadilly Street, Covent Street and Haymarket. This site was created by John Nash, as part of King George IV’s future plan to connect Carlton’s House with Regents Park.

Piccadilly Advertising Billboards
With the creation of Shaftesbury Avenue in 1885, the area turned into a busy transport hub. This made Piccadilly attractive to advertisers who installed here the first London illuminated billboards. For some time the square was surrounded by billboards on all sides, like the London version of Times Square. But currently only one building still houses large billboards.

Shaftsbury Memorial Fountain
The Shaftsbury Memorial Fountain is located in the center of the square. It was built in 1893 in memory of the famous philanthropist Lord Shaftesbury, who was famous for supporting the poor. The half-naked statue on top of the fountain depicts the Angel of Christian Charity, although it was later renamed after the Greek god of love and beauty Eros. The fountain was built in bronze, but the statue is made of aluminum. At the time, it was a new and rare material.

The name ‘Piccadilly’ comes from the fashionable collar of the same name in the seventeenth century. Roger Baker, a tailor working in this field, became rich thanks to his creation. The word ‘Serkus’ refers to the ring through which traffic circulates. Today Piccadilly Square is partially pedestrian. This is a favorite gathering place for people before going hiking in the nearby shopping and entertainment area. Soho, Chinatown, Leicester Square and Trafalgar Square with popular London attractions are within walking distance.

Rest in London: pubs and rock clubs of the British capital
Like compatriots to go to London. Probably tired of the myths about Paris as about a holiday that is always with you. In addition, for most of the graduates of…

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Tour in Scotland. Looking for the monster from Loch ness
Even if you do not read the tabloids and firmly believe that there is no monster in Loch ness, it is still worth visiting these shores in Scotland to enjoy…

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Scotland's Culture. Scotland Traditions. Scottish Cuisine
Historically, Scots have been underrepresented in British art and music, but they have nonetheless given the world a huge legacy in science, literature and philosophy. The Scots discovered logarithms, the…

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Age-old traditions of great Britain. Native English customs
There is no mask more mysterious than the open and friendly face of an Englishman. Having lived in England for more than four years, I already know them, of course,…

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London tour is cheap. It's real!
Review No. 1. London was pleasantly surprised at the airport: all the terminals of the British capital are connected to the suburban train stations, so you can get to the…

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