Learning English in England
Knowledge of English is very much appreciated now. A person with knowledge of English is much easier to get in life and find a good job. Only now it is…

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Pub culture in England
In the long wanderings around London you will visit a crazy thought in the spirit of the heroes of Woodhouse, looking like this: "And it would be nice to mix…

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Odiham Castle and its role in history
King John of the Landless is believed to have stayed at this 13th-century castle before setting off to sign the Magna Carta. Odiham Castle, or King John’s Castle, as the…

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Marble Arch London

Received an honorable place in front of Buckingham Palace, but later transferred to Hyde Park, the marble arch of London was modeled after the example of one of the most famous monuments of Rome. The marble arch was designed in 1827 by John Nash as the triumphal entrance to Buckingham Palace. At that time, John Nash was a successful architect who was largely responsible for changing the architectural appearance of the city in the early nineteenth century. Nash was famous for his work on Regent Street, Buckingham Palace, Cumberland Terrace and his master plan in the Marylebone area, around Regent Park.

In 1851, the arch was moved to its current site in the northeast corner of Hyde Park. Some historians say that the arch was relocated due to a very narrow central span. Others claim that when the palace was expanded in 1851, Queen Victoria asked for more personal space for her family.

Nash modeled the Marble Arch of London, following the example of the famous Roman Arch of Constantine, built in the fourth century. Both structures have Corinthian columns and three arches: one large central arch and the other two on the sides. The top of the arch is decorated with sculpted relief panels. They represent England, Scotland and Ireland. The arch was also decorated with many beautiful sculptures, which were subsequently dismantled and moved to another location. Today it is one of the most famous triumphal arches in the world.

In 1829, King George IV ordered an equestrian statue of himself for installation on top of the central arch. However, this was not to happen, and instead the statue was installed on a plinth in Trafalgar Square, where it remains to this day. Although the gate once served as the main entrance to the palace, today the Marble Arch plays practically no role, being located between the neighborhoods of Bayswater and Marylebone. When the arch was located at Buckingham Palace, only the main members of the Royal Family, as well as the Royal Horse Artillery and the Royal Detachment could pass through its arches. Today, anyone can walk through this landmark in London.

Dark Alley - the quaint tunnel of Ireland
Dark Alley - a popular natural landmark of Ireland, known far beyond its borders. Freakish trees grow near the village of Armoy in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. The tunnel is…

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Britain. Tour to the island of Jersey
If you talk about what is good island of Jersey, it is best to start not with what it is, and with what is not here. There is no unemployment,…

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Covent Garden in the center of London
Covent Garden is one of the most popular London attractions. The area around the glazed building at the site of the former vegetable market is always crowded, especially during weekends…

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5 things that do not need to go to London
London is the capital of the Great Britain - this phrase is familiar to everyone who has studied English. It is not entirely correct, since Great Britain is the name…

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history of Scotland
Scotland was originally inhabited by people engaged in hunting and gathering, who came from England, Ireland and Europe about 6000 years ago. They brought the Neolithic era with them to…

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