National parks and reserves in the Cayman Islands
Queen Elizabeth II Botanical Park lies halfway between the Eastern edge of North Sound and the East coast of Grand Cayman, about 20 minutes ' walk from Georgetown. The Park…

Continue reading →

Tour of the London underground
"Ladies and gentlemen," announces the driver of the train, standing at one of the stations of the Central line, " sorry for the delay, but in front of us has…

Continue reading →

Attractions In The Cayman Islands
Immersed in the tropical greenery of the Cayman Islands, famous for its excellent climate, is recognized as one of the world's best places for recreation and scuba diving, yachting and…

Continue reading →

Marble Arch London

Received an honorable place in front of Buckingham Palace, but later transferred to Hyde Park, the marble arch of London was modeled after the example of one of the most famous monuments of Rome. The marble arch was designed in 1827 by John Nash as the triumphal entrance to Buckingham Palace. At that time, John Nash was a successful architect who was largely responsible for changing the architectural appearance of the city in the early nineteenth century. Nash was famous for his work on Regent Street, Buckingham Palace, Cumberland Terrace and his master plan in the Marylebone area, around Regent Park.

In 1851, the arch was moved to its current site in the northeast corner of Hyde Park. Some historians say that the arch was relocated due to a very narrow central span. Others claim that when the palace was expanded in 1851, Queen Victoria asked for more personal space for her family.

Nash modeled the Marble Arch of London, following the example of the famous Roman Arch of Constantine, built in the fourth century. Both structures have Corinthian columns and three arches: one large central arch and the other two on the sides. The top of the arch is decorated with sculpted relief panels. They represent England, Scotland and Ireland. The arch was also decorated with many beautiful sculptures, which were subsequently dismantled and moved to another location. Today it is one of the most famous triumphal arches in the world.

In 1829, King George IV ordered an equestrian statue of himself for installation on top of the central arch. However, this was not to happen, and instead the statue was installed on a plinth in Trafalgar Square, where it remains to this day. Although the gate once served as the main entrance to the palace, today the Marble Arch plays practically no role, being located between the neighborhoods of Bayswater and Marylebone. When the arch was located at Buckingham Palace, only the main members of the Royal Family, as well as the Royal Horse Artillery and the Royal Detachment could pass through its arches. Today, anyone can walk through this landmark in London.

Welsh Culture. The Traditions Of Wales. Welsh Cuisine
Eisteddfod is purely a Welsh invention, which gives all travelers a mystical experience. The word Eisteddfod means "meeting of the bards", and traditionally Eisteddfod was a competition associated with the…

...

Universities in the UK. Oxford... Cambridge... And number three.…
Can you name the three oldest universities in Britain? Well, the first two are clear -- Oxford and Cambridge, everybody knows that. And the third? First clue: it is not…

...

Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol
Clifton Suspension Bridge is one of the most beautiful engineering structures in the world. It is located in the suburb of Bristol, UK. The bridge spans the Avon Gorge and…

...

Stonehenge: mysteries, hypotheses, and legends
Among the hundreds of stone structures inherited by the British from their forefathers, Stonehenge (literally — "hanging stone") occupies a special place. The giant size (the weight of some blocks…

...

The Rock of Gibraltar - Pillar of Hercules
The Rock of Gibraltar is a geology miracle located on the British territory of Gibraltar, on the Iberian Peninsula. This magnificent monolith is owned by the United Kingdom, located on…

...