Rest in England with a glass of wine. English wine - exotic product
Today we will talk about alcoholic beverages. Nice subject, isn't it? I myself love, a sinful deed... But not keen. I advise you. Recently invited to the feast "Beaujolais Nouveau"…

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Covent Garden in the center of London
Covent Garden is one of the most popular London attractions. The area around the glazed building at the site of the former vegetable market is always crowded, especially during weekends…

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Universities in the UK. Oxford... Cambridge... And number three.…
Can you name the three oldest universities in Britain? Well, the first two are clear -- Oxford and Cambridge, everybody knows that. And the third? First clue: it is not…

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Marble Arch London

Received an honorable place in front of Buckingham Palace, but later transferred to Hyde Park, the marble arch of London was modeled after the example of one of the most famous monuments of Rome. The marble arch was designed in 1827 by John Nash as the triumphal entrance to Buckingham Palace. At that time, John Nash was a successful architect who was largely responsible for changing the architectural appearance of the city in the early nineteenth century. Nash was famous for his work on Regent Street, Buckingham Palace, Cumberland Terrace and his master plan in the Marylebone area, around Regent Park.

In 1851, the arch was moved to its current site in the northeast corner of Hyde Park. Some historians say that the arch was relocated due to a very narrow central span. Others claim that when the palace was expanded in 1851, Queen Victoria asked for more personal space for her family.

Nash modeled the Marble Arch of London, following the example of the famous Roman Arch of Constantine, built in the fourth century. Both structures have Corinthian columns and three arches: one large central arch and the other two on the sides. The top of the arch is decorated with sculpted relief panels. They represent England, Scotland and Ireland. The arch was also decorated with many beautiful sculptures, which were subsequently dismantled and moved to another location. Today it is one of the most famous triumphal arches in the world.

In 1829, King George IV ordered an equestrian statue of himself for installation on top of the central arch. However, this was not to happen, and instead the statue was installed on a plinth in Trafalgar Square, where it remains to this day. Although the gate once served as the main entrance to the palace, today the Marble Arch plays practically no role, being located between the neighborhoods of Bayswater and Marylebone. When the arch was located at Buckingham Palace, only the main members of the Royal Family, as well as the Royal Horse Artillery and the Royal Detachment could pass through its arches. Today, anyone can walk through this landmark in London.

Cromarty Firth Oil Platform Cemetery
In the remote harbor in the north of Scotland, between two steep promontories are dozens of old oil platforms. They have been idle for several decades, quietly waiting for the…

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The History Of Wales
Wales is described as one of the oldest countries in the world where there is evidence of human habitation up to 200,000 years old. European Celts, who arrived in Wales…

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Castles of England. History in Architecture
The castles of England are not just architectural masterpieces, but also the embodiment of the traditions and history of this country. Here the most famous Englishmen, members of the royal…

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history of Scotland
Scotland was originally inhabited by people engaged in hunting and gathering, who came from England, Ireland and Europe about 6000 years ago. They brought the Neolithic era with them to…

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Great Britain Attractions
The United Kingdom includes countries such as England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland. Each of these countries is beautiful in its own way, with its own traditions, history, architecture and local…

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