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10 interesting facts about the Isle of Man
Everyone knows about Britain and Ireland, but relatively few know about the Isle of Man between the two giants. Despite its small size, the island has a unique and diverse…

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10 interesting facts about the Isle of Man

Everyone knows about Britain and Ireland, but relatively few know about the Isle of Man between the two giants. Despite its small size, the island has a unique and diverse heritage. Castle Rushen, one of the best preserved medieval castles in Europe, is one of the greatest attractions of the island. The Isle of Man also has the world’s largest working waterwheel used to supply mines with water, and there are a dozen ancient neolithic places to explore. The Isle of Man is particularly convenient for tourism, as most of the island can be seen traveling the network of historic steam railways. The capital Douglas can be explored with the help of horse trams that have existed since 1876, when in Victorian times tourism began to flourish. But there are many other points besides the heritage that make the Isle of Man an interesting place. I bring to your attention the top 10 interesting facts about the Isle of Man.

Geography
Located in the center of the Irish Sea, the Isle of Man is approximately equal distance between Ireland, England, Scotland and Wales. The length of the island is about 53 kilometers and a width of 21 kilometers. There is only one mountain on the island, Sneifell, which is 621 meters high. From the top of the mountain you can see Ireland, England, Scotland and Wales. Hills extend obliquely all over the island, with clearly defined valleys between them. Long sandy beaches surround the flat northern plain of the island, unlike the rocky cliffs that occupy the rest of the coastline. Over two thirds of this land is cultivated. According to the 2016 Isle of Man Census report, 83,314 people live on the island. This is 1.4 percent less than the 84,497 residents registered in the previous census. The average resident is 42.5 years old, and almost a third of the residents live in the capital city of Douglas.

Crown estates
Despite its location, the Isle of Man has never been part of the UK. However, it is one of the three island territories within the British Isles, which are known as Crown Holds. These islands are the self-managed possession of the British Crown. The title of head of state on the Isle of Man is Lord Mann, the role played by Queen Elizabeth II. And the Crown’s personal representative is the governor-lieutenant, appointed by Lord Mann for a five-year term. Meanwhile, the UK government is responsible for the defense and international relations of the island. Tinwald is also the world’s oldest continuous parliament, the legislative system was introduced around 800 AD, when the island was part of the Norwegian kingdom.

Low taxes
The tax system on the Isle of Man is completely separate from the system of neighboring countries. No capital gains tax, stamp duty or inheritance tax. For income tax, the standard rate is only 10 percent, and the higher rate is 20 percent. In addition, there is a total tax limit of £ 175,000 per person per total income payable. The Isle of Man even has its own currency – a pound on the Isle of Man (IMP). However, it has the same value as the British pound sterling, which is also widely distributed. Low taxes and various tax breaks prompted many wealthy people and families to settle on the island. But for companies, the most attractive part of the tax system is the standard zero rate of corporate tax. However, a higher 10 percent rate applies to banking and retailers with annual taxable profits of £ 500,000 or more. Due to the 0% corporate tax rate introduced in 2006, the Isle of Man is now known as an excellent center for offices of international companies.

Manx language
Manx (also known as Manx Gaelic), an ancient language closely related to Irish and Scottish Gaelic, still has traces of Old Scandinavian origin from the Vikings stepping on the island. Although this language was introduced to the Isle of Man by settlers around the fifth century AD, it did become a separate language in the 13th and 14th centuries after the collapse of the Norwegian kingdom of Mann and the islands. Until 1765, almost the entire population spoke Manx. This changed with the Isle of Man Purchase Law of 1765 (aka the Law of Return), according to which the Duke Atoll sold the island to the British Crown. Immigration from North West England also accelerated the decline of the language in the 18th and 19th centuries. Since the 1830s, a large number of English-speaking tourists have further contributed to reducing the number of people speaking Manx. In connection with the decline of the language in 1899, the Society of Manx Languages ​​was founded. Unesco officially announced the disappearance of the Manx language in 2009, some time after the last Manx speaker

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